Business as Usual, the Death Penalty

Business as usual, part 1.

A black guy in Minnesota is suspected of passing a counterfeit $20 bill. Did he do it? Who knows? Did he KNOWINGLY pass a bad bill? Who knows?At any rate he was tracked down and arrested. Handcuffed. Unarmed. Did not resist arrest. Walked off quietly with cops to their patrol car. Was placed on the ground, handcuffed and helpless and murdered. A man put his knee with full body weight on his neck as he plead for his life. Four cops watch him die. Business as usual.

A black kid is walking home in his own neighborhood in Florida. Eating his Skittles. Unarmed. Minding his own business. A guy follows him. A guy stalks him. The guy who is following him feels his life is in danger . So he continues to follow him. They clash. The unarmed black kid is shot to death. The jury acquits. Business as usual.

A black man on the East coast is selling cigarettes. Illegal. You can’t sell cigarettes on the street. The police come to get him. Drag him to the ground. Choke him. He pleads for his life. They kill him. They watch him die. Business as usual.

A little black boy in Cleveland is playing in the park outside his home. He is playing cops and robbers. He has a toy gun. The police pull up in a car. Start shooting. Kill him. His sister tries to get to him to comfort him. The police keep her away. They stand around and watch him bleed to death. Business as usual.

A black man is jogging on a public street in Georgia. He is hunted down by 3 white men and shot to death. The local police and district attorney find no reason to charge these men with a crime. He might have been a criminal. Maybe. Business as usual.

The murder of black citizens is not surprising. It is business as usual.

Business as usual, part 2. Imagine this. I bet you can’t.

A white woman is suspected of passing a bad $20 bill. The police arrest her and kneel on her neck. Killing her.

A white kid is walking in his own neighborhood. A black man feels threatened so he kills him. The black man is acquitted by the jury.

A white man is selling cigarettes illegally. Four black policemen drag him to the ground and choke him to death.

A little white boy is playing cops and robbers in the park near his home. A police car with a black cop pulls up and shoots the boy, killing him.

A white woman is jogging down the street. Three black men think she is a possible burglar. They kill her.

Can you imagine? The death penalty.

Passing a $20 bill. Walking in your own neighborhood. Selling cigarettes. Playing in your park. Jogging.

If you are black, those activities will get you the death penalty. Business as usual.

4 Comments

Filed under african-american, blacks, choke hold, crime, death penalty, government, police, police brutality, Politics, racism, United States

4 responses to “Business as Usual, the Death Penalty

  1. Joseph, you saw my post up today, so you know how emphatically I agree with you. We white folks can’t allow these outrages to continue. If you read the Val Demings Washington Post Op-Ed I quoted from, perhaps you’d care to provide your response you this question I have: she was wonderful in the impeachment hearings; she’s a former police officer with a calm compelling manner. Though she hasn’t been on the national stage from long, might she be the right choice as Biden’s running mate at this time in our nation’s history?

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am aware of Demmings and she is certainly qualified. I am still hoping that we see a Biden-Obama ticket, however. The Obama name still drives up voting for Dems and Michelle is one of the most highly respected people on the planet. I think it would be a landslide.

      Like

  2. whungerford

    Those are big things; other things are a problem too — introduced as Benjamin but called Bennie, told there is no vacancy at a motel when others are getting a different answer, changing a tire on your car and having police arrive not to help but to question you, etc.

    Liked by 1 person

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